Random Photos, Odds and Sods……..

The name Glasgow is thought to derive from the Brythonic Celtic ‘Cleschi’ meaning ‘Dear Green Place’.

The patron saint of Glasgow is St Mungo.

 

Random Glasgow photos that have not appeared anywhere else………

The Scotia Bar

The Scotia Bar

The Scotia Bar is Glasgow’s oldest bar and was where Billy Connolly first played before he found fame.

Insect-eating plant

Insect-eating plant

An unpleasant looking insect-eating plant seen in one of the Glasshouses at the Botanic Gardens.

The Crystal Palace pub

The Crystal Palace pub

This one is for Mr L and Miss A – spotted alongside Platform 1 track as the train left Glasgow  Central.  It does not look very open for business!

Update from Miss A is that the Crystal Palace is most definitely open as she had breakfast there Monday morning – the station side view is obviously not its best side.

The Clutha

The Clutha Bar

The Clutha Bar, scene of the dreadful police helicopter crash on 29.11.13 where 10 people lost their lives.

Glasgow's 'Boris' bikes!

Glasgow’s ‘Boris’ bikes!

Glasgow has its own Boris bikes scheme, recently launched with 400 bikes that can be found at 31 locations across the city.

A Glasgow drumlin

A Glasgow drumlin

Glasgow City is located on the broad valley floor of the River Clyde with hills to the north, north-west and south. The Clyde bisects the city from East to west.  Drumlins are small hills, there are approximately 180, formed as a result of glacial activity.

A flag of a Commonwealth country but which one?

A flag of a Commonwealth country but which one?

This flag was spotted amongst all the Commonwealth country flags in the display on the 3rd floor of the Games Family Hotel. Mrs L is curious as to which country has this image on their flag?

 

 

Advertisements

Day 9: Goodbye Glasgow!

Mrs L overslept this morning on her night shift!  She set her alarm incorrectly and woke with a start at 7.33……..normally would be up by 6.30!  It is amazing how well one can sleep on a skinny examination couch when one has too!!

It was the last journey back out to Battlefield on the no. 6 bus to get showered, changed and packed for the journey home to London late afternoon. It was also time to say goodbye to Steph and Kai, a lovely family – I hope I get to meet up with them again one day.  Mrs L’s week has been amazing!

There had been a vague plan to try and squeeze in one more cultural experience, a trip out to Bellahouston Park to visit the House for an Art Lover which is only open 10.00-12.30 on Saturday mornings.  However, this didn’t happen as timings would have been too tight…..by the time Mrs L got back into the city and checked her luggage into the left luggage storage at Central Station and then got the bus out to Bellahouston alongside everyone going to the nearby Ibrox stadium for Rugby 7s there would not have been enough time to do the House justice.  Mrs L will just have to add it to the list of things she still wants to do in Glasgow which include the Burrell Collection in Pollok Park; the House for an Art Lover; the Kelpies out at Grangemouth; a revisit to Glasgow University when it is all open; and moving further afield Mrs L wants to go to Harris for a holiday…….Mr L does not know this yet!

Miss A and Mr D arrived in Glasgow today at the start of their holiday for 3 days of Games spectating, starting with the Rugby 7s. It was great to meet up for lunch before Mrs L had to head home to London.  Glasgow is heaving so finding somewhere in the City centre for lunch was a bit of a challenge but third time lucky and we got a table in a Mexican street food restaurant, Topolabamba.  Our waiter was delightful but exhausted, the food was good but service less so……googling the restaurant later, it has only been open 2 weeks so a combination of new restaurant teething problems and coping with a sudden increase in the population of Glasgow City centre has perhaps been a wee challenge!

Clyde sharing Mr D's sprite

Clyde sharing Mr D’s sprite

We then went our separate ways – Mrs L back to England and Miss A and Mr D off to Ibrox.  Miss A was tasked with finding Clyde 10 who lives out near Ibrox……….

Clyde 10 - Edmiston Drive

Clyde 10 – Edmiston Drive

Time for Mrs L to say goodbye and thank you to Glasgow, you are one amazing city – it has been a blast!

Clyde travelling home in style!

Clyde travelling home in style!

Day 8: From Scotstoun to Glasgow Green

After a few hours rest and a catch-up (for the first time since last Friday) with her host, Mrs L headed out to Scotstoun for the squash.  Timing was perfect as the match between Nick Matthew from England vs. Alan  Clyne of Scotland was just about to start.  There was a big crowd of predominantly Scottish supporters who got behind their man but he lost in straight sets to the English number 1, also the gold medal winner at the last Commonwealth Games in Delhi.  Mrs L kept her cheering to herself as she was somewhat in the minority!

Squash: England vs. Scotland

Squash: England vs. Scotland

From Scotstoun it is a brief walk to Victoria Park, yet another of Glasgow’s many lovely parks scattered all over the city.  Glasgow has 60 parks, more than any other Western European city, built to provide green space for the people who lived/live in tenements and had/have no gardens.  Clyde 25 lives in Victoria Park and was minding his own business up by the ponds, he obligingly posed for his photo to be taken!

Clyde 25 - Victoria Park

Clyde 25 – Victoria Park

Mrs L then caught the number 2 bus  back to the city centre and got off at the stop outside Kelvingrove  to go back to the Pelican Bistro for her daily cooked meal – a very tasty veggie burger accompanied by excellent fat chips. The Clydes were also in for their meal……..

Clydes in the Pelican Bistro

Clydes in the Pelican Bistro

There was then still time to squeeze in some more Glasgow sightseeing so it was back to Glasgow Green and the People’s Palace which were both open, unlike on Monday!

Winter Gardens, Glasgow Green

Winter Gardens, Glasgow Green

Mrs L found Floral Clyde and spent an interesting couple of hours going round the People’s Palace, Glasgow’s social history museum.  There were displays about the rise of the trade unions; life during Glasgow’s wealthy industrial times followed by life in an overcrowded city with the associated poverty and disease; housing – the single ends, the tenements and then the tower blocks of the 1960-70s; the impact of war etc etc…….

Glasgow Green is one of the oldest public spaces in Glasgow.  It is also where the gallows were, public executions took place here from 1814 until 1865.  These were festive occasions with whole families waiting hours to get a good view. The last person to be hanged on the Green was a Dr Prichard, a poisoner, and 80,000 people watched him die.  Hangings then moved to Barlinnie Prison where the last hanging was in 1960.  Glasgow Green is currently a Live Zone for the Games and has a big screen to watch sport, a large stage for music, a chance to race against Usain Bolt, and some fairground rides for all to enjoy themselves.

GFH Medical Team - Another night, another team!

GFH Medical Team – Another night, another team!

One more night shift and then my Games are over 😦

Day 7: The Games Have Begun!

Well, Mrs L’s body clock is now completely muddled…….managing to get about 4 hours sleep in the middle of her night shift and then getting another 2-3 hours some time during the day so ready for the next night shift……..mind you, had a snack after waking up from ‘day sleep’ – this would normally be called breakfast but it was 4pm so not sure what to call it!!

GFH Medical Team - Afternoon shift meets night shift!

GFH Medical Team – Afternoon shift meets night shift!

Mrs L went onto shift early last night to watch the Opening Ceremony on our TV at GFH, otherwise would have missed it as travelling into the City.  There were a few extra bits we didn’t see at Monday’s rehearsals – well-regarded by all my Scottish colleagues, so good that they were happy with their Games Opening Ceremony.  The BBC voice-over was helpful as we had struggled to understand everything that was being said on Monday night.  Those Glaswegians are not always easy to understand!!

It was not straight home to bed for Mrs L this morning, instead it was the train to Dalmarnock and the Emirates Stadium for the opening preliminary session of the badminton.  Five matches were being played concurrently, Mrs L had good views of the Malaysia vs. Barbados games and also the Scotland vs. Seychelles games.  Malaysia were in a different league to Barbados and won the mixed doubles, male and female singles easily.  Scotland also won their games in 2 sets too – the crowd was certainly happy to see Scotland win!

Badminton: Malaysia vs Barbados

Badminton: Malaysia vs Barbados

Badminton: Scotland vs Seychelles

Badminton: Scotland vs Seychelles

Time then to track down Clyde 9 at Clyde Gateway outside the Emirates before heading home to bed.  With no time to slack, Mrs L was off out again late afternoon to head over to SECC (Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre) for the netball.

There were huge crowds at Glasgow Low Level station to get the train out to SECC – they have got an efficient one way system in place now so the crowds can be safely managed.  If you are heading west you can leave from Glasgow Low Level but if you want to go east you have to go to Argyle Station just down the road to get the train from there.

I got to SECC in time to see the final quarter of the very close Trinidad & Tobago vs Barbados game – T&T won 38-37.

Netball - Trinidad & Tobago vs Barbados

Netball: Trinidad & Tobago vs Barbados

The next game was St Lucia vs Jamaica.  Jamaica thrashed St Lucia 88-24 which is not altogether unsurprising as Jamaica are ranked 4th and St Lucia 18th in the world rankings.  Despite the huge difference in scores, it was a good game with the crowd rooting for St Lucia and cheering loudly with every goal scored – the British do love an underdog!

Netball: St Lucia vs Jamaica

Netball: St Lucia vs Jamaica

The stroll back from SECC into the city was a lovely 20 minute walk along the walkway adjacent to the River Clyde…….and Mrs L met up with 2 more Clyde friends – Clydes 5 and 17.

Clyde 5 - Broomielaw

Clyde 5 – Broomielaw

Clyde 17 - Lancefield Quay

Clyde 17 – Lancefield Quay

Now back at GFH ready for another night shift 😦

 

Day 6: All Good Things Are Free

First night shift done – managed to get a bit of sleep during the night as all quiet until around 6-7a.m when we got a couple of calls and needed to see one patient.  The rules for the Games medical team do not allow anyone other than a GP to issue a prescription which does somewhat limit the role of us Nurse Practitioners.  If I see a patient who needs a prescription, then the GP has to see them again – daft! The physios are also equally limited and are not permitted to use their extended roles either.

Mrs L headed back to Battlefield to get a few more hours kip before continuing her Glasgow exploration.  A great afternoon out in the West End at the Glasgow Botanic Gardens which is an arboretum and public park and contains some amazing glasshouses.  The Kibble Palace is a 19th century wrought iron framed glasshouse originally designed by John Kibble for his home on Loch Long in 1860; it was eventually transported by barge up the Clyde to the Botanic Gardens and erected in its current position in 1873.

Kibble Palace

Kibble Palace

The Main Range Glasshouses are similarly extensive and contain national and Commonwealth collections of plants of all sorts.

Main Glasshouses

Main Glasshouses

Cactus Collection

Cactus Collection

The Long Pit Glasshouse has been renovated but did not have many plants of note in it, presumably still be a work in progress.  One might think that going round glasshouses on probably the hottest day of the year here in Glasgow was not the most obvious activity to undertake…..and you would probably be right.  It did feel nice and cool once back outdoors where the temperature was a mere 25c!  Clyde 3 was enjoying the sunshine in the Botanic Gardens too, Mrs L is pleased to say he was easy to find!

What has been really amazing is that everything I have been too has been free.  All the facilities that Glasgow City Council run are free entry – all the parks, museums, art galleries.  Neither was there was a charge for the Hunterian and the Mackintosh House which are run by the University of Glasgow. Glasgow is a good value city.

Day 5: A Day of Culture

Before the culture began Mrs L headed back out to the Riverside Museum to hunt down the elusive Clyde, and there he was hiding behind the museum minding his own business, looking out at the River Clyde.

Clyde 19 at Riverside Museum

Clyde 19 at Riverside Museum

The Hunterian Art Gallery up by Glasgow University houses the Mackintosh House which is one of the most important collections of the work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and his wife Margaret Macdonald.  The house comprises the contents of their Glasgow home and their artistic estate.  They lived in Glasgow from 1906-1914 at 6 Florentine Terrace, a mid 19th century terraced house which they remodelled.  The original house had to be demolished in the 1960s because it was unsafe due to subsidence from underground mine workings.  The fixtures were preserved and reassembled as an integral part of the University’s Hunterian Art Gallery.  As to be expected and with a totally unbiased view, Mrs L considered this replica of the Mackintosh home to be truly stunning.

Mrs L was then hoping for a trip to the University of Glasgow visitor centre and a wander through the grounds but no……..the visitor centre and main quadrangle were all closed due to a Commonwealth Games business conference! The walk around the perimeter of the very old and and beautiful main University buildings was nevertheless very rewarding and people were able to access the smaller quad which had a couple of ‘kelpies’ on display. I am sure there is lots of history attached to this University – so somewhere to revisit next time Mrs L is in Glasgow.

Lunch was an excellent salt beef sandwich at the Pelican Bar and Bistro on Argyle Street just across the road from the Kelvingrove Museum.  A new bistro which won a best newcomer award in 2013.

The Pelican Bar and Bistro

The Pelican Bar and Bistro

Mrs L then had a quick diversion up to the Royal Hospital for Sick Children to spy Clyde 23.  More culture then followed with a fairly rapid trip through the Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery.  Highlights of the visit included the Glasgow Boys art exhibition – famous Glaswegian artists of the 19th and 20th centuries; Glasgow Stories telling the history of Glasgow at the height of it’s greatness in the 18th and 19th centuries followed by post-war decline in the mid 20th century and then followed by its rise back to greatness as a centre of retail, culture and the arts; a smaller exhibition dedicated to Mr and Mrs Mackintosh and the Glasgow style; Salvador Dali’s ‘Christ of St John of the Cross’, a controversial non-traditional portrayal of Christ on the cross but nevertheless impressive.

The final Clydes to find for the day were the huge Floral Clyde right in front of Kelvingrove – impossible even for Mrs L to miss!

Floral Clyde at Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery

Floral Clyde at Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery

However, the Clyde in Kelvingrove Park proved somewhat more of a challenge as several areas of the park are closed off due to Games activities – the Commonwealth Games bowls competition will be held here and there is also a Festival in the park.  Not to be thwarted, Mrs L walked around the perimeter fencing to finally get into the park and with the help of Google maps found the area where Clyde 15 was sheltering in the shade. With blue skies and temperatures up at 25c it was time for Mrs L to head home for a couple of hours rest before the start of her first GFH night shift.

Tomorrow the Glasgow 2014 Games will open!

Let the Games begin!

Let the Games begin!

Day 4: An On Off Sort of Day

Mrs L was definitely the tourist today.  The Glasgow City Hop On-Hop Off sightseeing bus comes highly recommended and is also something Mrs L likes to do when she visits a new city.

Glasgow City Sightseeing Bus

Glasgow City Sightseeing Bus

The first challenge was to find a dry seat on the upstairs open top section – although warm and sunny the seats had not yet had a chance to dry off as it was only 9.30a.m. Glasgow has a long and fascinating history.  St Mungo’s is the patron saint; tobacco, shipbuilding, mining, weaving and textiles were once Glasgow’s main industries.  There were once 62 shipyards on the Clyde, now only 3 are left.  The old Glaswegian industries have been replaced with retail, banking and insurance and are thriving in today’s Glasgow.  At its height in the 19th century Glasgow had a population of 1.25 million, today’s population is only 600,000.  Glasgow, Liverpool and London were the UK’s 3 major ports but ships sailing from Glasgow could reach the Virginias of the US with 20 days less sailing.  Presumably one of the reasons why tobacco was such a key industry to the Glaswegian merchants.

First hop off was at the Riverside Museum, Glasgow’s award-winning transport museum- interesting and well done.  It was only later that Mrs L found out there is a Clyde here…….so will have to go back to find him, Clyde hiding again!

Clyde at the Riverside Museum

Mrs L’s Clyde at the Riverside Museum

Once back on the bus Mrs L decided to stay on for the rest of the tour.  Tomorrow she will go back to the area of Glasgow University and Kelvingrove Park, Art Gallery and Museum and explore that area in more detail.  The Mackintosh House is at the Hunterian Art Gallery near the University and Mrs L does like all things Mackintosh!

Finally back at George Square at the end of tour and Mrs L decided to walk down to Glasgow Green and the People’s Palace.  Well, Glasgow Green was all shut off as preparations were still underway for the Commonwealth estival 2014 – it opened later the same afternoon, Mrs L was just too early.  Walking on to the People’s Palace to find that does not open on Mondays – Mrs L really was not having much luck!  Fortunately the Winter Gardens were open – a sort of tropical garden in a glasshouse attached to the back of the Palace.  A much needed cup of tea and a sandwich refuelled Mrs L for the walk out to Bridgeton Cross for Clyde 4 and then heading back into town to Glasgow Cross for Clyde 13.

People's Palace Winter Garden

People’s Palace Winter Garden

The tour had mentioned a place called the Lighthouse in the City centre.  The Lighthouse is the renamed conversion of the former offices of the Glasgow Herald newspaper. Completed in 1895, it was designed by the architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh.  It is now Scotland’s Centre for Design and Architecture and was opened in 1999.  Mrs L spent a happy 90 minutes here.

The Lighthouse

The Lighthouse

There was a gallery dedicated to the work of Mackintosh and his wife Margaret MacDonald, and also a floor with a gallery detailing the regeneration of Dalmarnock, the East End of Glasgow – this is where the athlete’s village is and will eventually provide 700 sustainable homes (400 for rent and 300 to buy) and will be a legacy of the 2014 Commonwealth Games for Glasgow.

Sue, a Games nurse colleague, and Mrs L met as planned at the Big G in George Square and headed off to the Merchant City quarter for an early supper before going out to Celtic Park for the dress rehearsal of the Opening Ceremony.  We had a great evening of which the details are a secret, so nothing to say other than it was a great show.  It finished late so not home until 12.30am. and too late to write this blog then!